A holiday cottage by the water, Djursland

Where to stay with kids in Denmark

Photo: Jonas Togo

From waking up in a treetop hotel in the countryside to staying in a waterfront youth hostel in the beating heart of a city, there are so many options when it comes to finding great places to stay with kids in Denmark.

Family-friendly accommodation in Denmark

You can't go wrong when it comes to finding somewhere to stay in Denmark with the kids: everywhere is super family-friendly! It just comes down to what makes a good holiday for you and your family: a quiet space for your baby? A garden the size of a football pitch for your older kids? A short walk to a sandy beach? A chance for the kids to make friends? Or perhaps you just need to stay somewhere where you don't have to do the dishes, for a change...

Self-catering family holidays

Summer houses are the obvious choice if you’re holidaying as a family and don’t want to be in a city. It’s also a great chance to go native. Danish families spend a lot of time in their countryside or beachfront cottages (which can be as well equipped as a family home, or may be more rustic, depending on what you choose).

Find out all about our divine holiday cottages and holiday homes here, and start dreaming of holidays where you get to know the local town well, have a large garden to play in and will have your own kitchen perfect for picky eaters. 

Kid-friendly hotels, hostels and B&Bs in Denmark

There are a good number of family-friendly hotels in Denmark to choose from. Most hotels will offer a cot for a baby and a lot of hotels will also offer a roll out bed for your hotel room, but of course it varies from hotel to hotel. You can see a list of recommended family-friendly hotels in Copenhagen here. If you’re staying in a city, look out for Scandic Hotels in particular, who have family rooms with a collapsible bunk bed and a double bed, ideal for families of 4. They also allow you to book the room next door if you’re travelling with teenagers.

Note that Denmark's beachfront spa hotels often have age restrictions for children and may be best for over 16s, so check before you book.

Hostels can be another great option for families, with private rooms and bathrooms along with kitchens and reasonable prices. You don’t have to be a hiker or a backpacker to enjoy them – in fact, you’re likely to meet other families there too. Danhostel and Hostelling International are two great places to start.

And then if you’re looking for an option where you don’t have to cook every meal yourselves, Danish B&Bs are a good choice. They are typically small and intimate, and some have family rooms, a small kitchen and space to play outside.

Family-friendly places to stays with a difference

There are also plenty of weird and wonder-filled places to stay in Denmark. How about sleeping in a treetop house? Or in a forest? Or in a safari camp right next to a rhinoceros? It’s all possible. Løvtag treehouses in Jutland are one of a range of exciting options for staying in Denmark’s forests. You can also see a range of superb glamping options at www.goglamping.dk where you don’t need to pack a tent or sleeping bag – just turn up!

When it comes to a wild night out, Knuthenborg Safari Park, Givskud Zoo and the Scandinavian Wildlife Park all offer overnight experiences, where you can stay in a safari camp, a Sami tent or a hut on stilts inside the zoo, and enjoy special access to their facilities and animal encounters after dark with a guide.

And if fun is what you’re after, what could be better (and easier) than staying onsite at one of Denmark’s biggest family attractions – LEGOLAND? LEGOLAND has two hotels and a holiday village to pick from, plus easily enough things to do nearby to warrant a short break. You can also stay at Hotel Fårup at Fårupsommerland, where they offer suites and rooms that work for families.  

Camping, shelters and more

If you dream of a simple life sleeping under the stars, you’re in luck! Denmark has a wide array of campsites, many of them close to the beach, with great facilities. Camping pitches are also mostly flat which helps a lot when it comes to a good night’s sleep. All facilities for campsites are approved by the local authorities and have to reach certain standards. You can browse for campsites via our directory.

Many campsites also have cabins that offer a slightly more luxurious take on camping. The most basic have a bed and an electric light as a minimum, while the most luxurious are more like a small summer house, with a private kitchen, bathroom and even TV.

If you’re feeling really adventurous, you can also sleep out in nature. There isn’t a ‘right to roam’ in Denmark but the Danish authorities allow you to camp out in their woodlands for free, or in a variety of small primitive campsites designed for families and small groups (many without toilets or facilities). Read all about your options on the Danish Environment Agency website here.